The Nominees are

 Farmers, food producers and restaurants collaborate to highlight the food of Åland. They invite you to explore the countryside and the genuine food production which teaches children as well as today's urbanized population more about the origin of food and life in the countryside. The Harvest Festival's business concept is to promote production and strengthen confidence in Ålandic products and activities. High quality, order and creativity are the north star of the participants. The festival inspires the participants to try and implement new, permanent activities and find new partners and concepts. The event will inspire consumers to demand local products all year round. The Åland Harvest Festival is the highlight of the autumn season in Åland and the engine and beating heart of Ålandic food culture. For three delightful September days you can enjoy Åland’s countryside in the midst of the most abundant harvesting time, learn about rural life, buy directly from the producers and eat fantastically good food founded on local and seasonal raw ingredients. http://www.skordefest.ax
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Participation and relationship marketing is a future way to go for those who work in rural areas. During the period 9 June 2021 to 9 June 2022, Åland's autonomy celebrates its 100th anniversary. Visit Åland has chosen to rent an apple tree of the variety Zonga in Öfvergård's apple garden, a tree for every Finnish city, to communicate the celebration, the destination and the Åland products. The apples from those trees have been mustered and sent to the cities before Christmas. The campaign has achieved great media success and significantly increased interest in Åland and Åland products. Under the Åland100 umbrella there are several food-related activities such as picnic event, competition of the Åland dish of the century, special food gifts. Increased collaboration with restaurants and farmers includes more local products in the Åland100-menus. All activities engage not only the locals but also awakes a great interest among our visitors. There is also a part focusing on education as in how to highlight the local products in events and restaurants, and with the food artisans in mind, marketing of our local delicacies in social media and so on. https://campaign.visitaland.com/aland100/
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Jessica is a role model for the children at the daycare center Prästkragen in Saltvik. She prepares nutritious and healthy food of great variety. With the kids in mind she invites them to find the joy of food, inspires them to dare to try new things. Everything is prepared from scratch from locally produced raw materials. She offers everything from traditional dishes and also keeps an eye on new trendy flavors. She bakes all bread herself. The children and staff are welcome to provide feedback and suggestions /wishes. She puts a lot of love and care into everything she does. She also spends a lot of her free time to give the food an extra silver lining, for example through serving berries she has picked herself. Her food is colorful, fresch and she always uses ingredients of the season. She is a lovely girl with a big heart, ambition and she always goes that extra mile to make everyone feel good. For example, she invites parents to breakfast (with home-baked bread as usual) on Mother's and Father's Day. She is also an expert at keeping the budget despite high quality food!
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Here, at Öfvergårds in Åland's apple kingdom, Anna and Jan grow and refine their own apples. In 2014, a hailstorm destroyed the entire harvest. A tough experience that came to be the start of developing the farm from a traditional apple orchard to an innovative and creative company that invests in food craft processing of the farm's own apples, farm tourism through apple safaris and farm visits for smaller and larger groups. The couple is an excellent example of how you dare to think new in an orchard. Throughout their operations, they work to strengthen the identity of Nordic raw materials, apples. They have many ideas and draw inspiration that can work in a Nordic context, several influences come from America and the Nordic countries where they have been active in bringing home inspiration and paving a new path for production within a fairly uniform apple production on Åland. They have Åland's only cooperative farm so far where you can rent apple trees on the farm and pick the harvest from the trees yourself. https://www.ofvergards.ax
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“Våffelrakan” is a foodtruck concept that Michaela and Jack started in 2019. The idea behind the company derived from Michaelas desire to refine her partner Jon’s products (Potato and onion). That wish combined with Jack’s dream of starting a food truck business ultimately led to what today is the unique company Våffelrakan. A Våffelraka is a new take on the traditional nordic dish hash brown where instead of cocking the graded potatoes in a frying pan, the våffelraka is made in a waffle iron with a more fine graded potato mixture and lots of butter. The potato waffle will then be served with different toppings depending on the season. The dish is fairly simple but very tasty and luxurious and both gluten- and completely lactose-free. Våffelrakan strives to only work with products produced on the Åland islands and right now the only thing that isnt is the whitefish roe with hope to get it in the future to  get the concept fully “AXgan” (Produced on Åland). Sustainability is also one of Våffelrakans matters of concern and we incorporate environmental thinking in the whole process including compostable cutlery, mugs and dishes.https://www.facebook.com/vaffelrakan
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The love of the sea and it´s treasures Västerro is a small paradise on Herrön, near Åland's southernmost point. Anders Westerberg lives here, a creative fisherman and food craftsman who takes the sea into the smokehouse and has his very own way of conveying the love of the raw material. Here, almost anything can be flavored with embers and wood shavings, and in the farm's fish restaurant you get to experience fish that you have never tasted before. Anders is the fisherman who innovatively tries to make the most of the catch and with smoking as a cooking method challenges the traditional. A visit to Västerro is something out of the ordinary, the food is always served as a surprise and if it ends in a tasteful firework, it starts on plates specially designed to lift the raw material, the fish, in all its delicious parts. In Västerro you are invited to a great Food Experiences in Västerros' gastronomic greenhouse. Samples from the smokehouse are served here and dinners are held on the theme "A sea of delicacies", when Anders prepares and serves today's variant of the Åland fish board. Both new and familiar flavors from the sea and nature…
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Arla MADlejr (Arlas FOODcamp) is nominated for EMBLA 2021 for the outstanding and widespread contribution to the educational support of young people's food competencies, the format provides. Regional studies indicate that only 4 - 7 precent of kids, contribute to the cooking process on a weekly basis, leaving many without basic food knowledge and cooking skills. This is where Arla MADlejr comes to the aid. The camps acts as a food school for kids and young people. The camps offer an educational course that supports the joy of cooking, strengthens skills to create good meals. It also provides knowledge on topics such as local foods, health and sustainability. In addition, Arla MADlejr aims to inspire and change daily habits to achieve a better lifestyle and greater well-being. Teachings are based in the official Nordic recommendations and easily applicable to a variety of diets and lifestyles. The camps are distributed on various locations around Denmark and has seen approx. 9.000 kids to undertake the free course – with the aim to provide 10.000 kids with access to the course – every year.  https://madlejr.dk/
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Contempehrary is nominated for EMBLA 2021 due to its innovative development of plant-based, natural and flavourful products, with a uniquely Nordic touch. Contempehrary develops and produces a brand-new product, Nordic tempeh. This is an exceptional product developed through fermentation of organic raw materials, exclusively grown in the Nordics, such as peas, hemp, local cereals and beans. Traditionally, Tempeh originates from the island of Java, however, Nordic Tempeh combines local ingredients with the rediscovered method of fermentation, that has swept through Denmark as the new Nordic cuisine redefines the Danish dinnerplate. What makes Nordic Tempeh unique is the fact that it is not a mock-meat or a meat replacement product – it is its very own thing, a tasteful sensory boost to the world of plant based products, proving that plant based foods can succeed on their own merits, and not just as a faux-meat. Furthermore, sustainability, quality and transparency are central to Contempehrary, underlining their vision is for Nordic Tempeh to become the preferred source of plant-based protein in the Nordic cuisine. https://contempehrary.com/
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Melstedgaard, Bornholm is nominated for EMBLA 2021 due to their extensive work to place the island of Bornholm on the gastronomic world map, thus ensuring a widespread recognition of Bornholm's extraordinary work with local food products and gastronomy. Located in traditional homestead, built in 1801, Melstedgaard has become THE scene for gastronomic innovation, experiences and education for professionals and tourists alike. Melstedgaard is Denmark's first regional food culture house. The location also houses Bornholm’s Madkulturhus (Foodculture Venue), Frilandsmuseet (Museum of local agriculture) and has its own farmshop – bursting with local artisan products, unique to the island. At Melstedgaard, guests can experience historical food production, cooking traditions of the past and the islands' flourishing current food culture. Working closely with local agencies, such as Destination Bornholm, Melstedgaard is the ultimate destination for sustainable development of local food producers AND gastro-tourism. https://gaarden.nu/
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Det Grønne Museum (The Green Museum) is Denmark's national museum for hunting, forestry, agriculture, and food. Here, children and adults alike, can experience Danish and Nordic food culture and history through a wide variety of well-crafted activities. Det Grønne Museum is a knowledge institution that works actively to preserve and cultivate old varieties of plants and animal breeds –uniquely including the guests in the process. In addition, the museum has an affiliated school, specializing in food knowledge (Madens Hus). Here, guests can get first-hand knowledge about ancient kitchen techniques and practice preparation of meals using historical kitchen utensils and techniques traditionally used Denmark. Det Grønne Museum is a uniquely Nordic experience combining storytelling and getting your hands wonderfully “dirty”. https://detgroennemuseum.dk/viden/den-levende-kulturarv/
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FANGST is nominated for EMBLA 2021 as a testament to their strong dedication to developing the Nordic food culture, by rediscovering the old preservation methods formally utilised by hundreds of small canning companies along the Nordic coastlines more than a century ago. The Nordic countries have a tradition for this fine preservation method and FANGST has successfully reintroduced canned fish and shellfish, as a high-quality product made with local ingredients and with an unyielding focus on using seasonal fish. Furthermore, FANGST strive to also introduce species not commonly consumed in the Nordic diet, such as Sprats (Brislinger) which are normally used for animal feed. FANGST puts much emphasis on sustainability and gastronomic craftsmanship, striving to work with both small-scale suppliers as well as larger companies – all in the pursuit of excellent taste. https://fangst.com/
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Frederiksdal Kirsebærvin is nominated for EMBLA 2021 for the production of incredibly unique and high-quality wine based on locally grown cherries and fermented using old techniques indigenous to this specific region of Denmark. The cherry wine is produced at Frederiksdal Estate, located in the Southern part of Denmark. The master winemaker employs a technique of wild fermentation before externally storing the wine outside in glass large balloons, allowing local weather to play a part in creating a unique taste. The production of cherry wine is based on Stevnskirsebærret - a locally found berry that historically created the basis for island of Lolland’s wine revolution. Frederiksdal Kirsebærvin is the only producer in the world that produces cherry wine according to these centuries-old principles. The highest quality, locally founded traditions and fantastic taste are at the centre of the production, and the ambition is to produce the world’s best cherry wine – many thinks that the goal has already been achieved. https://frederiksdal.com/dk
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The Junkgood initiative is nominated for EMBLA 2021 because of the socioeconomic initiative to provide well-tasting and nutritious food for the homeless, cooked by fantastic chefs and food professionals. Rasmus Munk, Head Chef and creative mind behind the fabled two Michelin stared Restaurant Alchemist, founded the project during the Covid-19 shutdown in 2020. When restaurant kitchens were forced to shut down for guests, it freed up time and space for cooking for a different crowd. Restaurants have since reopened but the initiative continues to live on after the pandemic. Junkfood ensures hot meals every day for hundreds of homeless individuals in Copenhagen, actively working with several homeless shelters and drop-in centres to deliver the food directly to many people in need. Every day, the team produces between 300 - 350 nutritious meals, allowing hundreds in need to enjoy a healthy, locally sourced and well tasting meal. Sustainability is at the heart of Junkfoods DNA. Among other things, the team works with FødevareBanken (the local foodbank) to have a surplus of goods delivered and has a keen focus on reducing food waste by cooking produce in season, from local producers and by rethinking the menu to fit the availability of fresh…
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Gásadalur is a stunningly beautiful village situated on the island of Vágar, and it is one of the last places on the main islands to be connected to the road system. In order to save the village from depopulation, a 1700 m. long tunnel was constructed to the valley (population: 16). Since the tunnel was finished in 2004, Gásadalur has been a popular tourist attraction, catering both with its scenery and its food. The fertile valley of Gásadalur, the nearby pastures of Víkar and the bird cliffs have always been regarded as a good larder, and the entrepreneurial villagers have revived and developed these resources. People from Gásadalur have pioneered the growing of vegetables, and the valley is one of the few places you can grow barley on the Faroe Islands. This barley is, together with water from the local stream, used by the local brewery Föroya Bjór to create “Múlafossur Red Ale”, a special beer named for the iconic waterfall in Gásadalur. The village slaughterhouse is converted into a restaurant (when not in use), which serves local products, and the villagers have developed new takes on traditional fare, fx. a fermented beef soup. https://www.visitfaroeislands.com/place/gasadalur/
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Jóhan Dávur Joensen is an artisanal farmer and amateur food-historian from the fertile valley of Gásadalur. With a keen understanding of Faroese agronomical lore, Jóhan Dávur has spearheaded and developed the local production of greens and vegetables. Jóhan Dávur´s unique take on farming rests in the understanding and implementation of “terroir” – the effect of the growing environment (local soil composition, slope, sunlight, precipitation etc.) on the growth and taste of vegetables. The result is amazing products grown from vegetable patches on the edge of 100 m . cliffs overhanging the ocean. Jóhan Dávur is a firebrand that focuses on creating a small quantity of exclusive products. John spars closely with his loyal customers, among others the 2 Michelin-star restaurant KOKS and Embla-winner Leif Sørensen, to optimize the quality and availability of his products, and he freely offers advice to fellow farmers in order to promote sustainable local food production. https://www.matkovin.fo/en/veitari/todan/
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Jóhanna á Tjaldrafløtti has, as the head of Húsarhaldsskúli Føroyar (the housekeeping school) in Klaksvík, dedicated the last 30 years of her life to educate, inspire and embolden the younger generations of the Faroe Islands. Under Jóhannas leadership, Húsarhaldskúli Føroyar is a modern and creative school, based in the strong gastronomical traditions of the Faroe Islands and the practical skills needed for a healthy, economical, and sustainable life. Húsarhaldsskúli Føroyar is a boarding school, and social activities and skills play a vital role in the educational approach. The school organizes several themed excursions (fx. at the lamb-slaughter in the fall) and combines a focus on local raw materials with nutritional knowledge, exercise, economics, arts and crafts and self-sufficiency.
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Rólant Waag Dam is a journalist and editor at Kringvarp Føroya, the national broadcaster of the Faroe Islands. He is an avid foodie and have throughout his tenure paid special attention to and promoted the gastronomic scene on the Faroe Islands. Rólant have made documentaries about well-known Faroese food professionals and their accomplishments; examples are Poul Andrias Ziska from KOKS and Jan Restorff from Søllerød Kro (both Michelin starred restaurants). During the Covid-19 lockdown of 2020 Rólant arranged popular digital beer tastings, and he has been profiled in Matbók (the Food Book), published by the lifestyle magazine “Kvinna”. https://www.instagram.com/rolantwaagdam
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Slaktið (the Faroese word for slaughter) is an annual food-festival in Tórshavn, the capital of the Faroe Islands. The mission of the festival is to introduce and educate an increasingly urban population to the precious resources provided by the land and the work that goes into procuring them. Set in late September, the festival features the public slaughter of sheep and cattle in an ordered environment, providing first-hand experiences of the processes involved. A commentator will explain each process, and later in the day the animals will be prepared and served for the guests by invited chefs and food specialists. The festival also features an array of locally produced vegetables, which gives local growers an opportunity to present and suggest uses for their products. www.facebook.com/slaktid
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TARI (the Faroese word for seaweed) is an aquaculture company focused on the sustainable farming of macroalgae in the Faroe Islands. Harvesting or farming of macroalgae for food is not an established industry in the Nordic countries, and they thus represent an untapped nutritional resource. Macroalgae can be cultivated, without the use of fertilizer and pesticides, in places where the natural ecosystem isn’t affected and can therefore play an important role in sustainably feeding the planet. Founded by the siblings Agnes Mols Mortensen, a researcher with a Ph.D. in macroalgae biology, and Mortan Mols Mortensen, a commercial diver with years of experience diving for high quality seafood, TARI draws on their respective competences to develop best practices for sustainable production of macroalgae. TARI has recently branched into salmon aquaculture, where they offer seaweed-based solutions to improve animal welfare in a sustainable way. The “Green Hatchery” is TARI’s latest initiative. The company is installing a water turbine in their new hatchery and production building with the aim to reach a carbon neutral or even negative budget. https://tari.fo/
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Dímunargarður has developed a unique sparkling alcoholic cider made from excess white turnips called Mai Rótabryggj. The inspiration for the cider stems from the first EMBLA awards in 2017, where Dímunargarður won the Nordic Food Producer category. Eva and Jógvan Jón from Dímunargarður met with the Danish candidate Æblerov (producer of cider from excess apples) during the ceremony in Copenhagen. Since their white turnips are almost pear-like in flavor, the possibility of producing a completely unique product, a root cider, was discussed. The excess roots were being used as cattle feed, and a cider would both increase the value of the resource and extend the durability of the product. Dímunargarður formed a partnership with the local brewery Okkara and its master brewers, Søren Antoft and Høgni Jensen, to solve the challenges of creating a new product from a novel resource. The finished product, the Mai Rótabryggj, was taken to market in 2019. The distinct flavor of the cider is a great fit with the powerful umami taste of the traditional fermented meats of the Faroe Islands, and it can also be used in refreshing mixed drinks. www.storadimun.fo
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An Appenzell native I grew up in a typical Swiss cheesemaker family. After graduating as a cheesemaker, myself, wanderlust grabbed me. In 1996 I was offered a job in Finland. The position was as a long-distance truck driver. Operating between Finland and Central Asia. In the year 2000 I acquired a 200-year-old former tenant farm in the deep Finnish forest. No electricity nor running water. Nowadays, the owners of the farm from the year 1900 are the namesake of our cheeses and therefore the main characters. In 2002 I founded my own "Herkkujuustola" (gourmet-dairy). The main reason for founding my own dairy was, that I was not happy with the selection of cheeses available. I updated cheese-recipes and manufacturing processes from my youth and adapted them so that they'd be compatible with the Finnish breeds of cows, the climate, and the consumers. At the 2012 cheese-competition in Finland, our washed-rind soft cheese won with the maximum of 100 points. 2016 I was elected Finnish cheesemaker of the year. It was the first time ever in Finnish history that a private commercial entrepreneur was awarded with this price. In the same year our herb filled WilliWili won the gold medal at…
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How does Finnish food taste? The Central Union of Agricultural Producers and Forest Owners (MTK) and Association for Rural Culture and Education (MSL) have made a practical “Kokkaa Kotimaista” (cook domestic) food education model for eight-graders. The aim of the model is to tell about Finnish primary production in a delicious and concrete way. It allows children to cook and get acquainted with the rich Finnish food culture. Food producers who are members of local MTK associations deliver delicious food baskets for use by students, giving young people chance to meet food producers as well. Teaching material is free for schools. Young consumers are increasingly interested in what they eat and how and where food is produced. At the heart of the debate are a healthy diet, food responsibility and environmental issues. The “Kokkaa Kotimaista”- campaign wants to inspire young people to cook, because the power of a meal cooked and enjoyed together is impressive. The model has been made easy for home economics teachers to implement. The food basket favors domestic ingredients and local food. The material in Finnish can be viewed freely here: https://moodle.msl.fi/course/view.php?id=25
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Steinerpedagogikens Vänner i Västnyland rf. (SPV rf.) is an organisation that runs the Mikaelskolan Waldorf school and the Rosengården Waldorf daycare in Ekenäs, Finland. The school has a kitchen of its own that serves 180 portions of food per day. The school and daycare were the first in Finland to employ the Diet for a Green Planet principles. Amongst the principles are eating less meat, using locally produced and seasonal ecological produce and cutting down on food waste. The goal is to teach the students to eat sustainably produced, healthy food. The program requires input from the kitchen staff, teachers and parents. Every fall, families deliver fruit and berries to the kitchen for the school year. All produce is as locally sourced as possible, and meat is served once a week. The school curriculum involves each grade of students in different ways: lower grades learn about the farming year in a hands-on way while the older students participate in planning meals with the school kitchen. The program has proved that it is possible to serve sustainable meals for many people on a daily basis, while raising happy, healthy children!
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Satokausikalenteri® is Finland’s largest digital food community, providing turn-key digital campaigns. The food culture is changing faster than ever and Satokausikalenteri is familiar with the change. With the help of our wide audience, we turn these changes into commercial phenomenon’s. Several megatrends are combined in Satokausikalenteri: responsibility, wellbeing, digitality. A strong theme is making better purchasing decisions. Communality is strongly present in Satokausi Media’s channels and the audience is highly committed and active. www.satokausi.fi
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The Kuopio region and the province of Pohjois-Savo are the first regions in Finland to receive the European Region of Gastronomy recognition for 2020-21, which can be compared to the title of Capital of Culture. In addition to culture, ERG recognition also develops a wide range of gastronomy and food events, food tourism, agriculture, education and entrepreneurship, and emphasizes responsibility. The ERG entity has been implemented as a project collaboration between ProAgria Eastern Finland & the Women of Agriculture and Housekeeping, the City of Kuopio, SavoGrown and Savonia University of Applied Sciences. More than 80 companies, event operators, educational institutions, and development organizations from all over the province are involved in the development work. Recognized by IGCAT, a network of European regions, it promotes cross-sectoral cooperation in the fields of food culture, tourism, urban culture, and the arts. For tourists, Pohjois-Savo's treasure chest offers authentic Savonian gastronomy, new experiences and diverse events wrapped around food. The main theme of the anniversary is foraging - life according to the rhythm of nature. Pure nature and local food on a plate: delicious Horta, sweet summer, harvest season flavors and first-class natural delicacies. The ERG logo communicates local and genuine, responsibly produced products…
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“I didn’t know anything about the bakery business, but when Covid silenced all my other work in the spring of 2020, I had to come up with something completely different. I studied online to bake the Hatsapuri I love. Through mistakes, the first hatsapuris were sold in the beginning of summer. Customers' interest in new types of warm bread delicacies struck us - there were people in front of the Puumala sales kiosk every day from morning to night. The work, which was intended to be temporary, took a leap”, says Ville Haapasalo. After a successful summer at Puumala Market, Haapasalo decided to meet the demand and expand its operations. “We are gradually expanding our territory from southern Finland to other parts of the country. Faith in the future is strengthened above all by the excellent co-operation with the municipality of Puumala and the growing interest of consumers in new products. We have been warmly received”, Haapasalo continues. The sales of Hatsapuri have been amazing and why not when it comes to a product which main ingredients are cream, butter, wheat flour and cheese. - After all, it can't go wrong with anything made of these ingredients, Haapasalo laughs. https://hatsapuri.fi/
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Karviaisten Farm specializes in cultivating broad beans. We are a family farm and have our own mills where we make use of the entire broad bean. All our products are packed on-site at Karviasten Farm, ground broad beans, flour, natural whole broad beans. We also produce our own roasted broad beans. We have developed many different types of broad bean products, which have been received very well by the consumers. We also make lovely broad beans that are coated with raw chocolate. Our product development is an ongoing process. We want to constantly improve and bring new broad bean innovations to consumers. Our brand is Voima-Papu, which means “power bean”. Our products contain 28% protein and 13.6% fiber. It is also naturally gluten free. Read more: www.karviaistentila.fi
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The IGASA concept has given several hundred children throughout Greenland the opportunity to get in the kitchen together. Across language, gender and age, new communities have been created with healthy food as the main ingredient. IGASA is a whole day in the kitchen for children, with a focus on creating communities and a safe environment for the children to explore new ingredients, cooking methods and tastes together. Especially how fish can and play an important role in everyday cooking and eating. At IGASA workshops, tasty food is prepared and eaten, there are physical activities, as well as learning about healthy eating and children's rights. Paarisa has developed the IGASA concept, and it is remarkable how they have created collaborations across partners such as UNICEF Greenland, Royal Greenland, FoodLab and the Greenland Sports Confederation. The main goal of this initiative is to create great experiences for children in the kitchen. Through both creativity and lateral thinking the aim is to rise children’s curiosity and critical approach towards food, meals, and raw ingredients. www.paarisa.gl
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One of the biggest challenges Greenland faces towards lowering greenhouse gas expenditure, is that most foods need to be imported, this means that the availability of healthy fresh vegetables and greens are expensive compared to other countries. This is an issue that Greenlandic Greenhouse is working to resolve through the production of high quality, pesticide free foods at a reasonable price, as well as contributing to a more sustainable and self-sufficient food delivery and supply system in Greenland. This is done by working around the cold arctic climate and permafrost through indoor farming methods. Their products are sold to both private consumers and companies. The greenhouse production is powered by sustainable energy delivered by the local hydropower plant, where they further utilize excess heat to warm up the production facilities, additionally 90% of the total water consumption is reused. www.facebook.com/Greenlandic-Greenhouse-1539930266152754/
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Salik Parbst and Miki Siegstad have traveled around Greenland and explored the local ingredients. With their eminent abilities in the kitchen, they have challenged, developed, and nurtured the food culture differences in the country. They have developed new and innovative food experience concepts with a focus on local food producers and entrepreneurs. Despite a challenging Greenlandic infrastructure, where it is not possible to drive from city to city, Salik and Miki have managed to get around and delight many people with exciting dining experiences. At their pop-up events they have prepared local and meaningful food and created a food culture cohesion across many people in Greenland. www.facebook.com/Igapall
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At Sassuma Sea Salt, the founder Napaartoq Petrussen uses the clean oceanwater as a resource, to produce pure and tasteful sea salt. He does this with respect for nature, culture, environment, and the local community. His idea is to bring salt to life with historical, experiential, intuitive and scientific understanding of what makes the process sustainable and successful. Napaartoq works tirelessly with product development and new flavors, using locally collected herbs and berries. He is very aware of the impact of his production on the environment, and the salt is produced with care, and with excess heat from the nearby powerplant. Sassuma Sea Salt increases the taste of Greenland and supports the importance of taking care of the sea, as described in the Greenlandic myth “Mother of the Sea”.  www.sassumaseasalt.com
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Every summer, Otto, Paarnannguaq & Nukappiaaluk Nielsen opens their farm and arms to the local South Greenland community to host Tasiluk Food Festival. As a self-sustaining fishing, farming and hunting household, they have the privilege of accessing the most delicious Greenlandic ingredients from soil and sea. They feel a strong sense of connection to their surroundings, and that includes their community. They believe everyone should have the opportunity to eat quality Greenlandic food in the company of their family and friends, served with heart and soul. Therefore, they work all year long preserving and preparing beautiful dishes that highlight the food they grow, hunt and fish themselves, and they have done so for the last ten years. Eating in a “hyper-local” way may be the trendy word for their Tasiluk Food Festival on Tasiluk Sheep Farm, but for them, it is their daily life and cultural tradition. https://visitsouthgreenland.com/tasiluk-staycation/ https://visitsouthgreenland.com/tasiluk-staycation/
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Adam and Thorlak are one of the most important entrepreneurs of nature and food-based experiences in Nuuk. They have created their own story outside the globalized and modern society, and they are inviting you to join them on a transformational journey of learning, adventuring, and rediscovering your roots. When you join the Two Ravens, everything that is served has been hunted and harvested by themselves or other locals. They teach you about the ingredients and how they have accompanied Greenlandic culture from past to present, important stories that enrich the food for locals and tourists alike. But the journey does not stop there, as you are also taught how to gather these ingredients for yourself, so if you were to find yourself in the wilderness or a mountain top without the ravens, you will have learned how to traverse and cook for yourself. www.TwoRavens.gl
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WildFood.gl is not only a food supplier and distributor, but an important driver for bringing Greenlandic cultural food to modern service standards, in collaboration with local hunters. By cutting out the middleman Wild Food brings resources from the sea directly to the private consumer in a convenient way. On their online platform you can follow on a day-by-day basis the wild food that is available for you. Additionally, you can pre-order a certain meat you’re interested in, and receive a notification exactly when the hunter has managed to catch your customized order. Finally, if you're interested in every cultural good, you can subscribe to their text and email service that will notify you the Catch of the Day. Wild Food’s idea is nurturing cultural sustainability by making cultural goods accessible to local citizens who do not have the time, skills, boat, or motivation to go fishing or hunting for themselves, as well as reducing CO2 by taking control of their own supply chain. www.WildFood.gl
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Unique goat cheese making in the north Farmers and couple, Jóhannes H. Ríkharðsson and Stefanía Hjördís Leifsdóttir live at Brúnastaðir Farm in north Iceland with their four children and are responsible for the cheese production. Everyone has their role in the process from taking care of the goats, feeding them and milking, making the cheese to marketing and technology related matters. There are a lot of things to think about from the start of the production to marketing. An incredible valuable part of our team is Guðni Hannes, cheese maker. He comes and helps us design the cheese and flavors and experiment with us on how to best use the milk. “When we moved to our farm, Brúnastaðir in Fljótin in the year 2000 we had to find opportunities for employment. Since jobs are far apart and winter weather conditions often very challenging we expanded our sheep farm by half and started to be foster parents. Later on we added tourism and cabins to the mix. The kids on the farm had animals of all sorts and they opened a little petting zoo during the summer months along with our tourism activities where the animals roam around in their natural…
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Has dedicated 25 years of her life to good, clean and fair food from Iceland Dominique is born French and moved to Iceland in 1970. She is married to an Icelander and has two children and 6 grandchildren. She is a geographer by education from French University, has lived for 10 years in Denmark and Norway and for the last 18 years has run her own Wine School for professionals and general public with international certifications, where she followed in many ways Slow Food values for organic and natural wines. She is now the leader of Slow Food Reykjavík (since 2008) and Slow Food in the Nordic Countries (2019) and has been an active Slow Food member from 1996, being a founding member of Slow Food Reykjavik. From the very start, she has been an educative support for the promotion of local food and small producers, when it was not yet a topic addressed by many actors in the food systems organisation. Meeting Carlo Petrini, President of Slow Food, in many occasions, she has realised how much of a visionary he is and sticks close to what is really important in the daily life of our society – he nicknamed…
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A Michelin-star chef in the heart of Reykjavík DILL restaurant was founded in 2009, by Gunnar Karl Gíslason, with the aim of delivering a unique and memorable experience of Iceland. Since their inception, they have continued to explore new methods and preparations of native ingredients that brings new life to the plate and the guest experience. Founding chef Gunnar Karl Gíslason, is at the restaurants helm, prepared to explore the vast and multi-faceted Icelandic countryside with his guests and deliver a procession of dishes that one might say is as predictable as the Icelandic weather. At DILL, the staff endeavor to respect all the raw materials that come to them, no matter how big or small, and utilize everything. Each thing grabs their attention and they do everything to make use of it. Inspired by the Icelandic landscape and dedicated to fresh ingredients, foraging and sustainability, at DILL, the aim is to share an exceptional dining experience that reflects the compelling characteristics of Iceland. DILL is based on a Nordic ideology in cooking and emphasize on the raw materials and traditions from Iceland. The simplicity is the key to let the ingredients flourish, unique as Iceland is. The food tells…
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First Icelandic Cream liqueur - Jökla Pétur Pétursson, dairy technician, is a fan of the Icelandic cow breed and their products. He decided 14 years ago to make the first and only Icelandic cream liqueur. There is a plenty of milk in Iceland and farmers are diligent in producing premium milk with the most beautiful cow breed in the world. At a certain point, Pétur perceived that some new innovation was needed in Iceland for this premium milk Icelandic farmers were producing every day. The idea was implemented in the kitchen at home in Mosfellsbær, near to Reykjavík, and the kitchen pots were used extensively. It was after a family skiing trip to Italy and his visit to an Italian dairy farmer that he returned home to Iceland and didn´t got the idea out of his head. The Italian farmer ran a restaurant besides his farming and when Pétur and family were eating a lovely meal at the restaurant the farmer drew from the freezer an icecold milk mug with a milk liqueur in it with a taste of citron, which the farmer cultivated himself out in the field. Traveling back home to Iceland, Pétur, was so fascinated after the…
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Create a better future for children through food Matartíminn (e. The Mealtime) was established in 2017 by vegetable farmers of the Horticulturalists' Sales Company. The primary objective of Matrartíminn is twofold. On the one hand, we are working to reduce food waste by fully utilising the harvest from Icelandic vegetable farmers. On the other hand, Matartíminn gives Icelandic school children better access to fresh and healthy nutrition. Our task is to win the hearts and minds of young people by giving them an early taste for fresh and juicy Icelandic vegetables. Today, we serve an average of 4,500 children per day in preschools and elementary schools. We strive to meet the needs of all our kids, but the most vulnerable groups, children with allergies and special needs, get our utmost attention. Matartíminn employs chefs with expertise in allergy assessment. Solid and good relationships with parents of children with special needs aid us in mapping the child's needs. Getting a clear picture of the child's allergy history helps the parents feel at ease, knowing that their children are in safe hands. Our chefs have a way to find delicious solutions to special needs, whether caused by food allergies, religions or beliefs. We…
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Pure, real and fresh wasabi The spark came in 2015 when we were two engineering students thinking of a new export product—utilizing the vast resources in Iceland. Our company, Jurt Hydroponics, captures the clean water, pure air, geothermal energy, and hydroelectric power of Iceland into a new niece product. The world is facing great challenges in food production, and water is one of the biggest players. Having the most freshwater resources per capita in the world, we look at it as our duty to make it possible for others to enjoy. We figured that the easiest way to do so was to grow water-intensive crops here and export them to foreign markets. Also, traceability in food production is a problem, and we were shocked to find out that almost all, or at least 95% of wasabi in the world, is fake. That fake wasabi, presented to all in general as the “real deal” is a mix of horseradish, mustard and green food coloring. Hence it is not a common knowledge that wasabi is a fresh vegetable, not something green out of a tube. These two factors have driven us to specialize in environmentally friendly and sustainable food production by producing…
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Unique food experience in the Westman islands The Westman islands are a archipelago south of Iceland, in the whole 15 islands with about 30 small cuts and drangar. The southern most island is Surtsey and the northern most is Elliðaey. Heimaey is the largest of the islands and the only one which is inhabited, where the town of Vestmannaeyjar is placed with 4200 inhabitants. The name Vestmannaeyjar is often used as a synonym for the town of Vestmannaeyjar. Vestmannaeyjar are the 12th most populous settlement in Iceland where fisheries are the main industry. The Westman islands has always been a food chest where fish play a central role. In the history, puffin-catching was for a long time the second biggest industry in the islands and there are many narrations on the use of seaweed and söl. A lot of herbs were used for medicine purposes and for example cabbage, which was picked in the nearby islands, saved the islanders from scurvy. Most of the farms that were placed in Heimaey went under the eruption in ** and therefore the history of farming in the island isn´t rich although there are still some small-scale farmers in the island. For a long…
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Dypvik has taken an old Norwegian tradition of clipfish (salted and dried cod), normally sold in large quantities and requiring substantial preparation, and turned it into a widespread delicacy, easily available in smaller packages, finished diluted and as ready-made dishes.   The unique natural resources of the Møre coast in western part of Norway provide the best conditions for clipfish; salty sea wind, cold air and good supply of quality fish. Each fish is washed and processed individually. The family business has been going on with their craftmanship for almost 100 years, inherited through three generations. However, clipfish has primarily been an export commodity. When the brothers of the last generation took over, they wanted to make their own mark and modernize the clipfish for ordinary households. With simpler cooking methods and a more thoughtful design on the package, clipfish has gained a much broader appeal among ordinary households.  Dybvik has helped to make clipfish and bacalao known and available throughout the country. They have developed and modernized clipfish from traditional preservation methods and home cooking, to become award-winning gourmet food that everyone can get hold of and prepare.    www.dybvik.no
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Geitmyra Credo is a branch of one of Norway's best and most sustainable restaurants, Credo in Trondheim. That Credo boss and chef, Heidi Bjerkan, chooses to focus on children and young people, shows how dedicated she is. - Children are the future, it is important to focus on the children. We must take children and young people seriously.   Geitmyra Credo uses the joy of food to teach children and young people to become fond of food that makes them feel good and to teach them about food in a holistic perspective - from farm to fork. Not only will it lead to increased competence about the students' own lives and health. It will also give them a strengthened understanding of sustainability, how to make good food choices and how to take care of life on earth. Credo has schooling, courses for kindergartens, internships for adults who work with children, courses for infant parents, leisure courses for children and families, open events, chicken houses, beehives and an educational kitchen garden. Everything happens together with one of the country's best restaurants - Credo. Credo Restaurant has branded itself on sustainability and an extensive collaboration with local farmers and producers. It has also engaged in training of young chefs. In 2019, Credo received Michelin's…
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Gulløye (Golden eye) from Northern Norway is the potato variety that is cultivated for the northern Norwegian climate, and is grown today largely north of the Arctic Circle. Both the special northern Norwegian climate, and the fact that the potato receives sunlight around the clock during the growing season, help to give Gulløye from northern Norway its distinctive character and terroir. The small potatoes have a strong taste, floury consistency, and delicate, yellow flesh.   Gulløye was a common potato variety 50 years ago, until other varieties took over more and more. The producer organization Ottar has lifted the potato variety again. They have also made Gulløye from Northern Norway known outside the region, and it is now available in grocery stores throughout Norway. Developing own varieties adapted to the climate and cultivation conditions in each part of the country is one way to increase green production and the degree of self-sufficiency, and to nudge food production in a more sustainable direction.   Tromspotet.no
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Kvitnes Gård offers world-class hyper-local food and accommodation in adventurous surroundings. Here the menus are rooted in local ingredients and the history of the region. The raw materials prepared at the restaurant come mainly from the farm with its own garden and its own animals. What is bought comes exclusively from local producers from the local regions in Vesterålen, Lofoten or Senja. The fish on the menu is fished from the fish-rich seas in the surrounding areas. The moose is shot by the farmer. Every part of the animal is used.  This requires a close collaboration with local producers, fishermen and slaughterhouses. In this way, the restaurant has full control of the entire food value chain, and a long growing season with sun around the clock produces fantastic vegetables and berries. This has undoubtedly been a recipe for success. Kvitnes Gård has become one of the big food talkies in Norway, with a stated goal of getting the first ever Michelin star to northern Norway. The magnificent nature has for a long time attracted tourists to Lofoten. Thanks to Kvitnes Gård, the northern Norway tourist map is expanded, and you go to Kvitnes in Vesterålen to experience local food culture.    https://www.kvitnes.com/   
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Norges Bygdekvinnelag (The Norwegian Society of Rural Women) is nominated for Embla for the work the organization does on disseminating knowledge about traditional food and sustainable use of food resources. The Norwegian Society of Rural Women has status as advisory organization on food traditions in Norway for UNESCO. This is an acknowledgement of the rural women’s competence and for the protection of the intangible cultural heritage that traditional food is. The food traditions they manage are not only interesting for historical reasons, but the knowledge about resource utilization and local raw materials goes straight to the heart of what society needs for sustainable consumption and less food waste. Through courses and dissemination, they transfer this knowledge to new groups. The local village women's teams hold courses for schoolchildren, young or adults in making everything from nettle soup to lefse and fish cakes. It is all about passing on the knowledge of local raw materials, techniques, and methods in food preparation. This is intangible cultural heritage, the traditions are transferred from hand to hand. Bygdekvinnelaget.no
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Ringsaker municipality is one of the country's largest agricultural municipalities. Local products are common in the municipal work. Through the project Matkommunen Ringsaker, the municipality works closely with local producers and the food industry to facilitate further use of local ingredients and food concepts. Production, tracking and delivery of local food, as well as distribution, visibility and marketing, have been linked to municipal services such as nursing homes, nursing homes, schools and kindergartens.   At the municipality's central kitchen, breakfast, lunch, dinner and supper are produced and delivered to residents in nursing homes, in housing associations and home-dwelling users. In this way, children and young people get a relationship with local food production, and the elderly and sick are served local food with information about where in the local area the food is produced.  The municipality has also been a driving force in adapting the legislation so that a larger proportion of local raw materials can be used in food production. In addition, a number of food festivals are organized to make the local food available to a larger audience. For everyone who lives and works in Ringsaker, quality food has become an attraction with a local affiliation.  Ringsaker.kommune.no
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Deep inside the world's longest fjord, in the Nærøyfjord World Heritage Site, lies Undredal. Cheese making is central in Aurland, and the village of Undredal is one of the few in the Nordic region that has an unbroken tradition of ranching and making goat's milk. At Undredal Stølsysteri, they have further developed the knowledge that has been inherited through generations. The village did not get a road connection until the late 1980s. Therefore, it has been a matter of course that the milk must be further processed in the village, and the farmers joined forces to make cheese and sell cheese. The farmers in Undredal are custodians of cultural traditions, and have saved part of our culinary biotope.   All resources are used, and the goats graze in steep slopes by the fjord, up to 1000 meters above sea level. The milk is not pasteurized, and processed into both brown and white cheese. During the summer, milking and cheese-making take place on two different stalls, the rest of the year down in the village. Undredal Stølsysteri is not making any compromises. It`s quality is not only related to technical criteria, but to animal health, soil, plant selection and grazing landscape. In Undredal, they still make the traditional unsalted protein-rich cheese,…
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In the small agricultural district of Stora Skedvi in Dalarna, Anders Åkerberg has built a now well-attended food destination with a market hall, restaurant, greenhouse, dairy and bakery – all with local food production in the center. A sustainable circular mindset permeates all activities. There is a lot that Anders has created through his entrepreneurial spirit, but to summarize: the history of the agricultural area Stora Skedvi meets the future through the food destination that Anders created for the visitors all over the world. https://skedvibrod.se - This is so much fun and a great honor! The nomination feels like confirmation that the work we have done over the past year has been successful. Nowadays we welcome our visitors to Skedvi Bröd - Sweden's new food destination, says Anders Åkerberg.
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Andreas Sundgren founder of Brännland Cider, has created a high-quality ice cider driven by the unique terroir of Swedish apples. He has through hard, consistent and sustainable work built a strong audience in his home market as well as internationally, a platform from which the company grows further both in terms of quality and value. The products carry a strong story of perseverance and uniqueness, their origins and methods where the specific Nordic landscape is a central player, creates, maintains, and develops exclusivity. Brännland Ciders produces several varieties of ice cider for the domestic and international market served in Michelin star restaurants all over the world. “It is a huge honor to have been selected as the Swedish candidate in the category Food Entrepreneur of the Year for the Embla Food Awards final. Any nomination of this kind is valuable because it pays attention to dedication and hard work” says Andreas Sundgren. https://www.brannlandcider.se/
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Swedish agriculture and forestry is a living learning tool and a fantastic resource. By introducing the English initiative Farmer Time to Sweden, Karin Carlsson, rural developer at Hushållningssällskapet, has created the opportunity for all children and young people to meet the farmer and producer to gain a deeper understanding of how food is produced. Through digital videocalls, children chat with the farmers and share knowledge. Karin Carlsson has, through her passionate interest in children's learning and passion for our Northern food traditions, managed to build bridges between schoolchildren and farmers with modern technology to communicate, create interest and increase knowledge about how food is processed.  It feels amazing! I am very humbled by the efforts made by everyone in Farmer Time: farmers, teachers and students as well as my colleagues around the country. It is great that our efforts are appreciated, and that knowledge of the initiative is spread. Together we create good relationships and mutual respect between food producers, teachers, children and young people, says Karin Carlsson.
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Lisa Lemke uses various channels in communication – TV programs, cookbooks, newspapers and social media. Her core issues around food are agriculture and sustainability, and that's something she’s actively working on. Her communication is genuine, honest and trustworthy. She wants to contribute to creating better conditions for Swedish primary producers and for consumers to gain a broader understanding of where the food they eat, actually comes from and why they should not only make choices that benefit our Swedish farmers, but also make demands so that we can eventually pass on a Swedish agriculture that is strong and alive in the future. This is the most important prerequisite for the development of Nordic food. "I am incredibly honoured and proud to have been chosen to represent Sweden for this fantastic award. This is an area that is not only close to my heart, but is the driving force in everything I do," says Lisa Lemke. https://lisalemke.se/
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Per-Olof Ingemarsson has with great perseverance, consistently stuck to and developed his concept. He has shown that it is possible to combine high demands on quality and run sustainable bird breeding in Torekov on the Bjäre Peninsula in Skåne. The family business Bjärefågel i Torekow AB’s customers are both retail and restaurants. "My colleagues and I work hard to raise chickens with high animal welfare and sustainability. Being nominated for this award is like getting a confirmation that our sustainability work as a niche company with a quality focus is visible and acknowledged. I feel very honored, says Per-Olof Ingemarsson. www.bjarefagel.se
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Sara Seing, dietary manager, developed an arena for sustainable produced local food in Södertälje municipality. By creating conditions, through cooperation with local actors, more producers can produce, grow, and sell their products to the municipality and inspire other municipalities to get involved in making more local and sustainably produced food a reality.  Sara has with her leadership managed to use the school meals to develop local initiatives for more sustainably produced food and food systems and increase the importance of good and nutritious diet for children. Om MatLust Utvecklingsnod - MatLust "It is a great honor to represent Sweden in this vital competition. Sweden as country is an example that serves free nutritious school meals. I hope that with this nomination we will share our knowledge and experience with other public meal operators in the Nordic region, so that together we can gear up and contribute to increased local sustainable food production," says Sara Seing
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Sophia Lovén has successfully developed a traditional Swedish lupin bean from Skåne into a tasty delicacy, named Temp:ish. Temp:ish is an organic, soy-free and gluten-free plant-based protein-source that consists of fermented lupin beans. She runs her artisan production on her farm in Roslagen, a coastal area in the province of Uppland. Sophia Lovén has built a transparent value chain for new green proteins that are otherwise mostly talked about in large-scale industry. This meets a new market, not least through smaller producers and restaurants looking for raw materials with extra values. Sophia has created a refined product for further refining. http://www.tempish.se - I’m happy to represent Sweden in the Embla Food Awards finals as a Nordic food artisan! I am proud to participate with Temp:ish, a fermented lupin bean, which is a fantastic Swedish-grown protein source."
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