The Nominees are

Denmark

Chef Adam Aamann has pioneered the revival of the Denmark’s lunch tradition. With skill and dedication, he has succeeded in simultaneously bringing the Danish Open-Faced Sandwich back to its roots and into the future. He has done this by honoring and refining traditional cooking techniques, only using high quality local produce and keeping a strong focus on craftsmanship. His efforts have placed Danish “smørrebrød” amongst the ingenious stars on the international culinary scene. Needless to say, his achievements have had fare wide consequences for the understanding of Danish food culture both locally and globally. An accomplishment that can only be achieved by a skilled artisan – such is Adam Aamann.

Website: www.aamanns.dk

Norway

IOM was founded in 2014. As a sausage maker located in the center of Oslo they are very close to the customers. They buy all their meat directly from the farmer and good animal welfare is one of their main focuses. Not only at the farm, but also on the way from the farmer and to the butcher. Their trademark is to use parts of the animals that the customers normally do not find in the supermarkets. And they use old sows, “retired” dairy cows and sheep and turn them into sausages and cured meat. They sell their products either directly to restaurants or the customer’s order by email, pay and then pick up the products at a pick-up point.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/indreoslomatforedling/

Website: www.iomat.no/

Faroe Islands

Traditionally bull calves are considered a waste product, which is disposed of at birth.

The farm Gásadalsgarðurin, situated in the picturesque village of Gásadalur on the island of Vágar, has come up with a concept to utilize this resource.

The calves are organically raised, slaughtered in the local slaughterhouse, and fermented in the local drying shed. This method is not traditionally used on beef, and the resulting unique product (even on the Faroe Islands) is then used in a fermented beef soup.

The soup, which has been highly praised by food-critics, is served for visitors in the aforementioned slaughterhouse, which has a beautiful view of the jagged islet of Tindhólmur.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/gasadalsgardur/

Sweden

The Hellström family is a new generation that continues to work on developing Swedish cheese tradition. Here in a red-white farm dairy, some of Sweden's best cheeses are produced.

17 people live in the small village of Södra Svedjan in the western botanical forests, which lies in the slope down towards Storkågeträsket. Here one of Sweden's most famous cheeses is produced. Svedjan Gårdsost is award-winning and even served at the Nobel dinner. The farm's 40 cows deliver the milk to high quality cheeses.

"Through the farm dairy, we get the outlet for our longing to create something that conveys heart, pain and much more that belongs to the hardworking and beautiful in life on a farm in the northern forest countryside".

Website: www.svedjanost.se/

Åland

Öfvergårds is located in Tjudö - the apple farming kingdom of Åland. The farm has about 6,000 trees. Anna and Jan Alm took over the farm in 2010 after Anna's parents, who once took over from their grandparents.

A passionate food artisan couple behind the success of Backmans Smakverk, Jonas and Tina Backman has succeeded both in SM and FM in food crafts with their air-dried products. To them food crafts means protecting old, traditional cooking methods, but at the same time using contemporary spices and seasonings. To preserve the good of previous generations but also to pass it on to the future.

Websites: www.ofvergards.ax and www.smakverket.ax

Denmark

Claus Meyer is one of Denmark's most famous chefs and food communicators. For three decades he has been an inspiration for the Danish food culture and he was the ideator behind The New Nordic Kicthen manifesto. A process that resulted in a number of top chefs signing a program for the development of a new Nordic cuisine. The manifesto was a commitment to local products, sustainability, biodiversity, inclusion and health, and the aspiration was to create a brand new cuisine that would brighten the world by its deliciousness, its responsibility and its distinctive character and, eventually, be counted amongst the greatest cuisines in the world. In 2003 Claus Meyer and chef-partner René Redzepi co-founded the groundbreaking restaurant Noma.

Website: www.meyersmad.dk

Norway

Heidi Bjerkan: The acknowledged chef Heidi Bjerkan has made it her trademark always promoting the unique taste and qualities of the commodities in her cooking and communication. At her restaurant Credo in Trondheim she has taken her passion for sustainability to a new level in her way of communicating to her guest: awareness of the close bond between the farmer, chef and consumer is for instances visualized by portrait photos of every cow she gets milk from, their name, age etc. Thanks to the close cooperation with the farmers, she received Michelin's first sustainability price in 2019.

Fannremsgården: Farmer, historian and lecturer Jon Fredrik Skauge delivers milk and dairy products to Credo restaurant. Heidi Bjekan and Jon Fredrik Skauge share joint passion for quality and tradition. On his farm in Sør-Trøndelag, located in the midst of Norway, he milks his seven cows of the traditional “Sidet Trøndercattle” . Because he van separate the milk from each cow he then has the opportunity to create products such as sour cream from each cow. Journalists from many parts of the world have in recent years taken great interest in what is happening at Fannremsgården and have visited the farm, lived on the farm, been involved in everything that is done on the farm.

Website: www.hanen.no/bedrift/528

Website: www.restaurantcredo.no/en/restaurant

Faroe Islands

Dr.phil & fil. dr. Jóan Pauli Joensen was for 16 years rector of the University of the Faroe Islands where he is now a professor emeritus of ethnology and cultural history. He has furthermore been curator at the Faroese National Museum for many years.

Jóan Pauli has spent a lifetime studying and documenting the Faroese cuisine and the associated crafts in an effort to promote and preserve a unique food culture under pressure from the ready availability of imported food.

Jóan Pauli’s research led to his seminal book on faroese food cuture and traditions: “Bót og biti: Matarhald í Føroyum”, which is used today as a reference whenever faroese gastronomy is discussed. He has since authored additional books on the subject.

The waning interest in faroese cuisine has now reversed, and traditional faroese techniques and crafts, who’s preservation Jóan Pauli Joensen played a large part in, are now in use again, often in new and innovative ways.

Sweden

Anette is a communicator in time. At a time when everyone who wants to be able to communicate, the competition is hard to reach through the noise. She succeeds with her genuine way of getting even ministers to listen. She manages to get messages that change laws and guidelines, for example within the school food and that the Swedish dairy cow is not a climate threat.

Anette is a proud Swedish milk farmer with 130 organic dairy cows in a village north of Stockholm. As the city and country slide increasingly apart, it is important that those who produce the food to the table show and tell about their everyday life. The communication is via debate articles, social media, lectures in schools for consumers, politicians and with study visits and via TV. Anette communicates difficulties easy and simply.

She is a driven and courageous communicator who dares to take the debate to secure food production and future recruitment for what she describes as a fantastic profession.

Website: Billinge gård

Åland

Johan Mörn is a true Åland food ambassador and an entrepreneur with amazing storytelling skills. Together with chef Viktor Eriksson he constantly lifts the bar regarding local food and together they reach new levels serving guests that visit Silverskär food determined by the season, the fish and the meat collected from nearby farms and the waters around. Johans enchanted stories always highlights the Åland food and history in a way that catches your attention. Johan has coined the concept of Axgan, which has become widely known and is commonly used locally. Silverskär consists of several islands. The visions and the concept are based on offering guests the Åland archipelago experience and the whole resort is deeply rooted in the fishing community that has flourished here for hundreds of years.

Websites: https://skordefest.ax/axganen-valjer-%20lokalproducerat/ and www.silverskar.ax

Iceland

Powered by sustainable energy, Traustholtshólmi offers an all-inclusive nature retreat on a secluded island in the South Iceland Region. This eco-friendly stay includes breakfast, dinner and a walking tour of the island's nature and history. Carpenter Hákon Kjalar Hjördísarson and his dog Skuggi are the island’s only residents.

At Traustholtshólmi, guests are offered accommodation in Mongolian Yurt-tents and a 3-course dinner of fresh fish or lamb. Hiking, seal watching and bird watching are possible in the surroundings. Fresh salmon can be caught between June-July. Guests can participate in wild salmon catching, harvest from the centuries old garden and enjoy the bounties of nature.

“I wanted to realise my life-long dream of building a self-sufficient home on the island.” Hákon explained in an interview.

Website: www.thh.is

Denmark

In the village of Herslev A part of Herslev shows how sustainable food production can taste, smell and take place. Here, specialty foods are produced and children and adults are invited to experiences, debate and insight into a diverse food production. In addition to agriculture, brewery and chocolate factory (opens on August 1, 2019), Herslev has a well-attended farm shop and restaurant. All open for tours, tastings, conferences and events. A Part of Herslev is a partnership for companies with high standards of taste, raw materials and craftsmanship that contribute to a living circular society. At the same time, the partnership is a social cluster where vulnerable people also have a meaningful working life.

Website: www.endelafherslev.dk

Facebook: www.facebook.com/endelafherslev/

Norway

ArktiskMat (Arctic Food) is an annual foodfestival in the picturesque and remote town of Mosjøen, midnorth of Norway. Unlike most food events, ArktiskMat is arranged by a school. Their culinary and agricultural students are very important as both participants and executors of the arrangement. Since the start in 2012 ArtiskMat have focused on achieving awareness around our arctic resources and a sustainable approach to them. Arctic Food is a meeting place for young and established chefs and food people and during the years some of the most respected names in the food industry have held lectures here in an aim to contribute to increase the recruitment to the world of food and food production.

Website: www.arkmat.com/

Faroe Islands

The cool and quirky people behind the café and travel center “Gimburlombini” (the Gimmer Lambs) on the island of Nólsoy are exceptional at including the locals in the tourists experience and using what the island has to offer in an innovative and modern way.

The food in the café is based on locally available produce and wild herbs from the island.

The more traditional and old fashioned small island life is put into a totally new and contemporary context when “Gimburlombini” takes you on a hike picking nettles and then makes nettle pizza on the grill, or when you go on a fairy tale walk or a pirate hike with your kids.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/gimburlombini/

Sweden

The food, the fantastic landscape and the people have long been a reason for visitors from many parts of the world to travel to Österlen. For eleven years, visitors have been attracted to the annual Matrundan in Österlen event during the four day weekend in the end of May.

Matrundan Österlen, is an association where 42 companies are members. During the four days of the event, visitors are guided and shown and sharing knowledge and experiences. They are presented news and classics, trends and traditions. Invites to great experiences in small-scale productions and the flavors are on the plates in restaurants and cafés. Matrundan Österlen has also participated in the Swedish national team at Grüne Woche in Berlin 2018 and 2019, to attract visitors to the region Skåne in Sweden.

Website: www.matrundan.se

Denmark

Anne-Birgitte Agger has been the driving force in improving the quality of meals provided in the public sector since the 1990s by advocating and enabling greater consumption of seasonal organic fresh products in public sector kitchens. Agger is decidedly innovative when it comes to good food ideas that create the radical changes that are needed to transform our meals and our society. She has converted the public kitchens in Copenhagen to 90% organic under the concept ”conversion in the mind and in the kitchen”, and has been the driving force behind a new and improved eating culture in the public space.

Norway

Matvalget (e. The food choice) is a guidance service for catering to large households/institutions who want to make sustainable and organic food. Their food and environmental guides can assist in everything from food-related courses, inspirational courses and tours, seminars, as well as guidance in menu planning and purchasing with sustainable commodities for large kitchen in municipalities, county municipalities or private chains. Matvalget performs an important social mission in the Norwegian authorities' goal of increased production and consumption of organic food.

Website: www.matvalget.no

Sweden

The World Championships in alpine skiing and Biathlon took place in the course of 1 1/2 months in Jämtland 2019. The competitions were organized by the partnership network WCR, World Championship Region.

The competition succeeded with the goal that 80% of the food served at the arenas to VIP guests, audiences and volunteers was produced in Sweden with advantage for local and regional food. In addition they achieved the goal of 100% Swedish animal welfare and food requirements. The local and regional food has been made visible on the spot for visitors. The regional added value was signaled via table riders, informative food posters and films about food and food production shown on the big screens in the arena. Through cross-industry meetings in the food value chain, many new collaborations and business contacts have been established. Thanks to the focus on food as part of the sustainability goal during the World Championships 2019, the region has strengthened the position as a professional sustainable organizer of major events. The World Championships events 2019 can be seen as a start and inspiration for others including food as an important regional development force. The World Championships have been visited by more than 200,000 people.

Åland

Godby High School is the second largest high school in Åland. The school has 30 teachers and 200+ students, divided into profile classes according to areas of interest; creative, media and language, natural scientists and sports.

The school's vision is to create a school culture where trust and knowledge are at the center and where all pupils are given the opportunity to develop on the basis of their own conditions and in this way have a stable foundation for lifelong learning. As movement is known to have a positive impact on learning and well-being the school places great emphasis on physical activity. The kitchen's staff work with joy and care, local produce, preferably organic, to give the school's students and staff the best possible fuel for body and mind.

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/skolbespisningghs

Denmark

When two friends, Eric and Line, met in New York in 2009, they came to wonder why the soda market was so boring while the rest of the culinary scene was on the rise. They rediscovered an ancient brewing technique for non-alcoholic drinks and spent years fine-tuning the fermentation in their kitchens until they found a way to make the World’s best-tasting, low-sugar kombucha - a soft drink with a refreshing flavor and probiotic properties. Læsk is only 3 years old, yet already well-established in Copenhagen. They have made innovative product collaborations with Claus Meyer and The Coffee Collective and they are working with IKEA to encourage everyone to begin fermenting sodas at home for a healthier future. The small team of (now) 4 has set out to change the soft drink industry for good.

Website: www.laesk.dk

Instagram: www.instagram.com/laesk_kombucha

Facebook: www.facebook.com/LaeskKombucha

Norway

Rørosmeieriet is one of the few craft-based local dairies who have grown from small and local to a national relevant actor with broad distribution. Since their start in 2001 they have challenged and innovated the Norwegians dairy marked and always been true to their food traditions and roots from the Røros area. The recipes they use are older than artificial fertilizers and pesticides, and therefore they think the best and most lifelike commodities are ecological. They have been able to make a range of products from traditional handmade cheese to cow milk bottled on a top modern dairy plant with big success.

Website: www.rorosmeieriet.no

Faroe Islands

Johannes Jensen was raised in a hotel, worked in the Faroese Seafood industry for 18 years and now 15 years in the hotel – restaurant business. He has started 13 restaurants, all of whom have unique concepts, and has played a significant role in showcasing Faroese cuisine to both a national and international audience.

Among his restaurants is KOKS, an 2 michelin-starred restaurant that focuses on local raw ingredients, and Heima í Havn, a collective of four restaurants in adjacent historic houses that have been restored to past grandeur with grass roofs and tarred wood in narrow cobbled streets. One of these restaurants, RÆST, is solely focused on the traditional fermented products on the Faroe Islands, something that would have been unthinkable just 10 years ago.

Johannes thus embodies the risk-willingness, diversity and innovation that is necessary to sustain the faroese food community.

Sweden

The farmer's pantry or Bondens Skafferi gives local producers the opportunity to get their products out on the market, from ordering to picking up the products on the farm where they are produced. Bondens Skafferi is the link between producers’ chefs and grocery stores. They enable commodities from farms to end up on the Chefs menu. Their entrepreneurship starts from ordering to distribution. Locally produced food creates the novelty of where it is produced and who is behind it. Chefs, and restaurant guests get a relation to the food's origins while preserving and developing local and regional food traditions. They serve as an important link to those who run a restaurant or delicatess store to meet the customers' growing interest in food produced in the neighborhood where you live.
Bondens Skafferi with traditional and local produce brings unique flavors and makes Swedish cuisine something special!

Website: www.bondensskafferi.se

Åland

Jennifer and Lars-Johan are a young, energetic and innovative couple who fulfilled their dream of small-scale, organic milk production with their own farm dairy. They have a genuine interest in animals and agriculture and great visions for the Åland countryside. Mattas Gårdsmejeri (e. Mattas dairy farm) helps to lift Åland as a gastronomic region.

They have a cafe on the farm which they open in the summer, where they serve among other things their popular Halloumiburger, and their own ice cream. Their cheeses and their yogurt have won several medals in the Finnish Championships for Food Artisan products.

The Mattas farm has been inherited by Jennifer's family since 1815, some 200 years and counting.

Website: www.mattas.ax

Denmark

Hestbjerg Økologi is an old family farm with roots back to 1623. We are the 16th generation. Our passion is pigs, and we focus entirely on supplying high quality organic pork. Our vision is to provide the very best conditions for our pigs, and to continue to acquire consumers who are willing to purchase our pork. This vision has led to “the poplar pigs from Hestbjerg”. Animal welfare is fulcrum in this concept. However, recycling, minimization of CO2 emissions, and respect for our nature and wildlife is becoming an increasingly important part of our production frame. This is a dynamic process where the journey never ends. Together with 25 motivated employees, we love our jobs, and hope that tomorrow we are able to push the frame a little bit further than yesterday.

www.hestbjerg.dk

www.facebook.com/hestbjerg.dk/

Norway

Roderick Sloan is one of Norway's leading commodity suppliers. He reaps and delivers top sea products to several of the world's best restaurants. Norwegian Green sea urchins, found off the coast of Arctic Norway, is collected by hand, by diving, in the freezing North Sea water by Roderick himself.  He is particularly keen to harvest from the sea in a sustainable manner. Most of what he finds in an area, he leaves behind and he does not reap more than growth. Throughout his work he is truly an ambassador for Norwegian seafood and marine resources. 

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/roddiesloan/?hl=nb

Faroe Islands

The neighbouring farms of Miðstovugarðurin and Uttastovugarðurin are situated in the village of Sandur on the island of Sandoy. They have pioneered the challenging art of growing vegetables on the Faroe Islands, which had been abandoned for several generations due to the difficult natural circumstances and cheap imports. 

Through trial and error they have developed specialized approaches to vegetable-cultivation in the harsh environment, and the availability of high quality local produce have been instrumental for the development of the faroese gastronomical environment.

The farms have tirelessly promoted the awareness of high quality local produce, for example through a local potato-festival, which is now an annual island-wide tourist attraction.

The latest development is the formation of an interest group based in Sandur called Veltan, which works to promote the production of vegetables on the islands, both for own use and for distrubution. Veltan also works as a sales platform and is the basis of a new Folk High School centered on vegetable-production.

Sweden

Gunnarshögs Gård is a family farm and has been run by the Nilsson family since 1897. In the scenic Österlen, of southern Sweden, among golden fields of rapeseed the raw materials are grown which are then processed to be sold in the farm shop and by retailers all over the country. The business has evolved from a traditional agriculture to an innovative food company with cold pressed rapeseed oil in focus. The rapeseed is grown at the farm or nearby, which gives full control over the entire production, from seed to bottle. Cold pressing takes place on the farm and is a very gentle process, which with low temperature and mechanical force, pressing the oil out of the seeds, drop by drop. This result is a rapeseed oil of the highest quality, with natural golden color and a lovely nutty taste. Gunnarshögs Gård contributes to a living countryside, sustainable development with jobs, profitable entrepreneurship and high quality food. The assortment consists of different kinds of rapeseed oils, marinades, dressings, and roasted seeds. Gunnarshögs Gård also has an ongoing project together with the University of Lund where they want to create a vegetable protein of the residual product from the oil pressing.

Åland

In the early 90s, Sören took the first step towards what today is Överängs Mill in Saltvik. Twenty-five years later, the mill has been expanded and Sören can name himself as a miller. He started grinding wheat flour with a stone mill that was driven around by belts and a tractor. The flour was sold to relatives and friends and through them word spread. Three years later, the demand was stable. The mills moved out of the garage and a used stone mill was purchased. By this time, a ton of flour a year was produced. Everything done by hand. Inside the mill Sören's clever solutions are made visible in the web of pipes, floor to ceiling, all necessary for the grain to pass all stages to finished flour. 

Sören´s basic requirement is that the raw material is organic and locally grown.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/overangs/

Denmark

Haver til Maver (HTM) is an independent non-profit working to strengthen food literacy of future generations. The core is a program of 8-12 full school days through April to October, where students sow, grow, harvest, cook and eat their own vegetables. What started as a local initiative in Northern Zealand has become a widespread movement to ensure school gardens as part of primary education in Denmark. On one hand, the gardens are seen as inclusive space, where school curriculum comes to life in new inspiring ways. On the other, the garden is a classroom for the intangible, 21st century skills relating to critical thinking, creativity, cooperation and the capacity to lead sustainable lives. Today, more than 10.000 students annually in Denmark have school gardens as part of their primary education, and an increasing number of international partners are using HTM as a resource center for garden-based learning and education for sustainable development.

Website: www.havertilmaver.dk

Norway

Norsk smaksskule (e. Norwegian tasteschool) teaches school- and kindergarten employees how they can amplify their teaching in taste, cooking and use of commodities in their education of children. The courses are free of charge. Its main vision is to make the children get the most possible flavor references and train them in separating tastes from others. The purpose is to create positive behavioral changes related to food and dietary habits among children and young people across the country. Since 2007 about 50.000 Norwegian children and 1000 teachers have been engaged in the tasting school. Norsk Smaksskule is a project run by Norwegian Cultural Heritage - and by the idea of chef Arne Brimi.

Website: http://www.kulturarv.no/norsk-smaksskule

Faroe Islands

The Seafood Festival (“Ein dagur á grynnuni”) aims to showcase Faroese seafood to a young and urban population who might not have had the opportunity to experience the islands’ most important resource up close.

The festival gives young and old the opportunity to try a vast array of different seafood free of charge, such as lobster, mackerel, shrimp and porbeagle or the splendid fish soup, all served by the festival’s many volunteers, which include members of the Faroese parliament.

A daylong fishing competition is arranged for children who wish to catch their own seafood, there is an opportunity to step aboard and experience Norðlýsið, an old Faroese schooner captained by fisherman Birgir Enni, and children and young people are entertained by live performances. Sjósavnið (the national aquarium) is on hand to display various fish types, which children can touch and learn more about.

Sweden

At Hamilton's preschool, led by Miljana Vulovic, it is cultivated everywhere, in window frames, in the greenhouse and in pallet collars. The plants are chosen considering what fits in the Nordic climate and what can do good for both the human and the planet. Everyone is involved in the cultivation, the children, chefs, parents, educators, preschool manager and researchers.

The children and staff at Hamilton's preschool have worked with researchers at NordGen for two years. With practical exercises they gain knowledge about cultivation, our Nordic cereals and genetic diversity. Knowing the earth with its own fingers and thinking about who lives in the seed creates curiosity, thoughts and new knowledge about nature's cycles and our Nordic diversity. Miljana is the enthusiast who inspires the children to get to know our Nordic climate-smart basic raw materials and its cultural-historical value. She connects the raw material to the food the children enjoy.

Children's quotes "You can make porridge and smoothies of oats" or "We may mix the seeds so we get flour".

Åland

Farmers, food producers and restaurants collaborate to highlight the food of Åland. They open up the countryside and the food production for today's urbanized population to explore, and teaches children more about the origin of food and life in the countryside. The Harvest Festival's business concept is to promote production and strengthen confidence in Åland products and activities. High quality, order and creativity are the north star of the participants.

The festival inspires the participants to try and implement new, permanent activities. The event will inspire consumers to demand local products all year round and serves as a platform providing a good opportunity for the entrepreneur to introduce new products and test their potential. Everything at The Harvest Festival is produced on Åland.

Website: www.skordefest.ax

Finland

The Food waste-battle is a popular concept in Finnish schools were 9th grade students learn how to prepare food from leftover ingredients, facts about food waste and to respect food. In the Food waste-battle students in home economics elective groups got food that otherwise would have been thrown away from the store. In home economics class students turned the random ingredients classed as food waste into two-course meals learning to take liberty from recipes. At the same time the students learned about food waste and how to minimize it. In autumn 2018, 100 schools across Finland signed up to the Food waste-battle and the concept reached over 6600 9th grade students. The battle culminated in an Instagram competition where students could publish pictures of their food waste meals with #hävikkibattle2018.

Website: www.saasyoda.fi/hävikki-battle

Instagram: www.instagram.com/explore/tags/hävikkibattle2018/

Iceland

Matartíminn (e. The mealtime) is a trademark owned by farmers who strive to increase the share of Icelandic products on the schoolchildren's tables, especially Icelandic vegetables, meat and fish. The company has made remarkable progress in increasing the share of Icelandic goods in primary and pre-primary schools in the capital area of Reykjavík.

Matartíminn is known for its flexibility and variety in production and servive. Emphasis is placed on ensuring food safety, and there are strict working rules regarding food allergies and food intolerance. At the beginning of each school year, there are briefings for parents and children on diet and the focus of the company. By following dietary recommendations, it is easier to ensure that the body receives the nutrients it needs and promotes good health and well-being of the children.

Matartíminn devotes a great deal to fully utilize all the farmers' crops and ensuring that no food waste occurs.

Website: www.matartiminn.is

Åland

Emmaus Recycling Café is an oasis in the middle of Mariehamn with a café, restaurant, greenhouse and urban cultivation. The vegetable garden offers work training, garden therapy and social rehabilitation in a very practical way. Combating not only food waste but also social hardship with their trainee program, Emmaus Returcafé has created a unique concept. Serving top quality vegetarian cuisine lunch, dinner and brunch using locally and self-grown ingredients, mixing it up with food market supplied food waste, they serve a holistic concept. Eating green, local, seasonal, and climate friendly has never tasted better! Oh, and did we mention that their furniture is all supplied by a secondhand store?

Websites: www.emmaus.ax

Finland

The Slow Food philosophy about good, clean and sustainable food that benefits both the producer and the environment permeates the whole Slow Food Festival Fiskars that was founded in 2009. The festival has since then had tens of thousands of visitors and has become a popular event for visitors. The exhibitors are local farmers, small scale producers or restaurants and all the products at the Slow Food Fair are produced or processed in the region. The festival has been able to promote locally produced food and producers in the region and make the festival and the Fiskars area in to an important national food destination.

Website: www.slowfoodvastnyland.org

Facebook: www.facebook.com/events/648109035588697

Finland

Salpaus is one of the largest providers of vocational education in Finland preparing more than 2500 free school meals daily – continuously reducing food waste and favoring local ingredients. Salpaus is a pioneer in using Finnish vegetable protein and in introducing vegetarian options to professional catering. Cultivating and increasing the use of domestic plant-based proteins has positive effects on nutrition, on the environment and on the protein self-sufficiency. Salpaus’ catering team has led the way by sourcing its broad beans and peas directly from local producers. It has built extensive collaboration networks throughout the food supply chain, and shared insights and information with professional catering providers, students, staff and the public. Finnish vegetable protein has also been widely promoted and served at prominent events, even at the President’s Independence Day reception.

Website: www.salpaus.fi

Facebook: www.facebook.com/salpaus/

Iceland

IKEA in Iceland has achieved exceptional results in the sale of food in recent years. Now IKEA's restaurant in Garðabær is among the most popular ones in Iceland. During a 12-year period, the turnover increased thirty-six-times which is quite unique. After the economic collapse in 2008, the management decided to increase the restaurant service with the aim of getting more customers into the store. They decided among other things to give children free meals and lower prices of various dishes. That worked brilliantly.

The restaurant focuses on national food traditions and national ingredients. A new and improved bakery sells popular bread, small dishes and sandwiches, salads and classic pastries at a reasonable price.

Managers of IKEA in Iceland have focused on selling food that does not need to be transported far away.

Website: www.ikea.is/veitingasvid

Finland

Silmusalaatti (Finnish for “sprout salad”) salads grown by organic farmer Samuli Laurikainen are mixtures of different sprouts and shoots that are grown from organic seeds of broccoli, alfalfa, reddish, clover, peas and lentils using only fresh water and light. The clear water of Lake Päijänne and clean seeds are all that is needed for cultivation - no fertilisers, pesticides, or preservatives are used. The Silmusalaatti flavour comes from carefully selected varieties and their mixture ratio, with nothing extra added. The energy efficient growing facilities are located only 15 kilometers from downtown Helsinki. Today the brand's salads are packed into recyclable cardboard cartons and sold in grocery stores all over Finland.

Website: www.silmusalaatti.fi

Facebook: www.facebook.com/Silmusalaatti

Iceland

Íslensk hollusta is a brand founded in 2005 by Icelandic biologist Eyjólfur Friðgeirsson. His aim was to develop and produce health foods from Iceland. The company set out by producing herbal teas, spices, condiments, cheese, snacks, herb-marinated seaweed, berry juice and bath products.

Friðgeirsson’s work is creative and original. He came up with new ways of producing Icelandic products, such as toasting sugar kelp to make a healthy snack, using birch, mountain herbs and angelica for cheese making, putting rhubarb and angelica together to make chutney, or mixing pulverised pumice and earth extracted salt from a borehole in Reykjanes to make a bath salt with health benefits.

The ideals behind Íslensk hollusta are to use pure, Icelandic natural products and to let them enjoy their own freshness and simplicity using traditional Icelandic methods but reinventing cultural traditions. All ingredients are handpicked in Iceland with an emphasis on sustainability.

Website: www.islenskhollusta.is

Finland

Satokausikalenteri’s (e. “The Harvest Calendar”) mission is to increase consumption of vegetables and promote benefits of eating seasonally. Started in 2013 as a wall calendar, Satokausikalenteri has sold over 120 000 copies and grown to be one of the biggest digital communities in Finland reaching organically over 700 000 fans each month. Since 2015 Satokausikalenteri has increased numbers of vegetables sold by over 10 million kilos per year, helped introducing new varieties of domestic vegetables and been notified for its climate work with an invite to The President’s Independence Day Reception in 2018.

Website: www.satokausikalenteri.fi

Iceland

Gísli Matt is a chef & entrepreneur and a true food promoter, born in the tiny island of Vestmannaeyjar in 1989. Gísli graduated from culinary school in Iceland with high honours in 2011. He started his own restaurant, Slippurinn, at 23 years of age along with his family back in 2012, a modern Icelandic restaurant in his hometown. Gísli later opened two more restaurants, Matur og drykkur and Skál in Reykjavík. Both restaurant are known for original and fun take of traditional Icelandic cuisine.

Gísli has been a big part of the Icelandic Slow food movement since 2012 and takes great pride in showcasing Icelandic produce and methods trough his restaurants and various pop up's around the world.

Website: www.gislimatt.is and www.slippurinn.com

Finland

Hauhala goose farm specializes in breeding geese following ethical guidelines and producing own goose meat products. Free-range grown geese are living thus free from stress – in spacious and stimulating environment in the midst of Finnish lake district. The whole production is made in-house following highest ecological standards. The entire bird is carefully utilized while upholding the principles of ethical production throughout the production chain. Top-notch goose products are delivered for restaurants, catering, wholesale and consumers. The dedicated product assortment is designed to meet the needs of the most demanding consumers. Hauhala has been recognized with various national awards.

Iceland

Vogafjós farm has been owned by the same family for about 120 years, passed from one generation to another. The farm consists of approximately 120 sheep and about 40 cows and cattle. The farmers at Vogafjós run a small restaurant inside the cowshed where you can see the cows through windows. Everything served is homemade local food such as smoked trout, lamb, mozzarella and salad cheese made from their own milk. Rye bread, which is baked in the ground in geothermal heat, is sold warm to the customers.

Together with the farm and the restaurant, the family at Vogar, run Vogafjós Guesthouse with total 26 rooms. Vogafjós is certified by the official quality and environmental system that is used within Icelandic tourism.

Website: www.vogafjos.is

Iceland

Erpsstadir is a dairy farm in Northwest Iceland, run by farmers Thorgrimur Einar Gudbjartsson and Helga Elínborg Guðmundsdóttir. Erpsstaðir, with about 60 dairy cows, are best known for their small-batch dairy products such as ice cream, the traditional Icelandic Skyr, caraway cheese, white and wet cheese and various other dairy products which the "Cream Shop" at Erpsstaðir processes. All the milk for the production is from the dairy cows on the farm. For other ingredients Þorgrímur and Helge strive to use local, seasonal flavours whenever possible, such as rhubarb, dandelion honey and blueberries. The farmers at Erpsstaðir are pleased to offer visitors the chance to take a closer look at the milk production. Visitors at Erpsstaðir can experience a real Icelandic farm and buy homemade artisan dairy products first hand. Thorgrímur and Helga also offer accommodations for interested visitors.

Facebook: www.facebook.com/Rjómabúið-Erpsstaðir-1608772829405443/

Finland

Ainoa Winery embraces the spirit of the Nordic cuisine movement by using local ingredients to create something extraordinary. The key to great wine is great fruit, and Finland has the best berries in the world - especially the wild berries. Treated right they can turn into world-class wines that reflect the terroir of the northern forests. Ainoa Winery wines fill a gap that has existed in Nordic cuisine, allowing complementary pairings to create a pure Nordic taste experience where great wines are combined with great food. This gives those planning meals a new tool to further amaze diners with the richness, variety and simple goodness of flavours from the North.

Website: www.ainoawinery.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ainoawinery